How to Stream 4k60 at it’s Very Best



As games are getting bigger and better and the hardware is getting more and more powerful, 4K60 is becoming the norm. If you’re a streamer, you’re going to need to learn how to capture 4K60 gameplay effectively and beautifully. Here are the tips and tricks you need to know for capturing the latest and greatest games at their very best.  What does 4k60 mean?  This means maintain your stream at 60 frames per second while streaming 4k resolution.

It’s important to note that 4K isn’t quite ubiquitous just yet. Streaming at 4K resolutions like 3840×2160 (or even higher) is extremely demanding, and even viewing such high-quality streams can be demanding on the viewer. It takes a lot to output your games at 4K; you’re going to need fast and reliable internet and a powerful PC at the very minimum, but if you can do it then your stream will be ahead of the curve and it’s a great way to future-proof your content.

First of all, you’re more than likely going to need to use 3rd party streaming software like OBS or Xsplit. This is because capture software that comes with capture cards generally does not support 2160p, and typically won’t even allow you to stream higher than 1080p. 3rd party streaming software does, however, let you capture and stream games at higher resolutions than 1080p and so if you want to output your games in 4K you’re going to want to use OBS or Xsplit.

The settings you should be using to capture and streams games at 4K will vary on your setup and your personal requirements but here are some recommended settings to get you started. These settings should give you something to aim for and may be subject to change.

4K UHD (2160p)- same as the capture frame size

60 fps – or same as the capture frame rate

Video encoded at 16000 kb/s

Audio encoded at 128 kb/s

Encoder: Hardware

Encoder preset: quality

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Wpj9urJiUK5eeKdEVsYXe1Mlhp5BWxzcBNiomvYTsvW4DAIdALL-x16fAVLXW7OvOCSumQmyu1S7k-6USNA2GQxLLEf8KwptTnIxkB8qgPAMTb2p2JlkXhyibqRqrKm7hZ3ptKyU

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/1eaI_6L8Jap_eV_sVPZVUoVkCPpm8ZjyTyQhOew69Caq59Blhhy-nWNZzszym0rm5Jal2xPYDnLQFsc3OFaImrJm0MSR13k64qGWK55qIkNwR7QmvkgBmY_kWOmGmyR7pxsYb1hb

If you’re looking for specific settings to record gameplay, check out OBS’ recommended setup. Note that this is for recording gameplay only and not for streaming.

4K Streaming Internet and Bandwidth Needs

Of course, the real hurdle for streaming out 4K video at 60 FPS is the sheer intensity of the bandwidth you’ll be outputting. Video of that quality is going to need some serious upload speeds to cope. Naturally, this means you’ll most likely need a Gigabit internet connection or some pretty powerful hardware compression.

Hardware compression is basically a means by which you can reduce the file size you’re outputting on the fly. To do that, which would be a good way to circumvent not having extremely good internet, you’d need a very capable PC. If you’re a streamer you probably already have a powerful streaming rig, but if you don’t then you’re going to need to look for a powerful GPU (a 1080 at the minimum) and a very good CPU (a high-end i7 or equivalent will most likely do).

There are some capture cards that will do hardware compression for you like the HD60 Pro. This can be useful for taking some of the burden off your computer but the HD60 Pro can’t output nearly as much bitrate as the 4K60 Pro (which can put out up to 140 Mbps instead of the HD60 Pro’s 60 Mbps). It’s a solid option if your computer isn’t a Titan-wielding beast.

Compare the capabilities of several of Elgato’s capture cards below. Their upcoming 4K60 Pro card is obviously the most capable but also naturally the most expensive.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/rOE6OlV_xhC1dkM9rRD2LRoKzhk7fnfRfiYsB-dZUBKiDTQsA5r8XFHC7QbErQgsyZolkwCoD8-L7gr_xbamRZwWOdvGe6T7G0aAAu8M8DMqts4xyDdjAcOi29I-ZxsNPff_CKOY

4K Streaming Capture Cards

A good capture card is essential to running a high-quality stream. You could have the fastest internet and the most powerful computer but if you don’t have the right capture card then you’re going to be struggling.

There’s a lot options available to you, and even more as we move toward 4K video being the standard. Choosing the right card may seem difficult, but if you know what your demands and capabilities are then it shouldn’t be a problem.

Elgato’s 4K60 Pro is out later this month and is a great choice for streaming at high resolutions. As broken down by TechReport, the card can competently produce 4K content if you want it to but it’s going to need a real beefy PC. At least a “sixth-generation Intel Core i7 CPU or an AMD Ryzen 7 processor, and either a Nvidia GeForce 10-series or an AMD Radeon RX Vega graphics card” as they put it. Pretty hefty. They also claim that the card will chew through an impressive 1 GB of disk space per minute at the highest bitrate. At $400 though it’s the most affordable 4K-capable capture card you’re going to find on the market.

Alternatively, Epiphan’s AV.io 4K card is a great choice for 4K streaming. With its variety of resolution options and great audio capture it’s an excellent choice. It isn’t quite as capable at producing 4K content at 60 FPS but it’ll do 4K30 just fine. The consensus on this card is essentially that it’ll do 1080p60 no problem but higher resolutions can’t do higher than 30. A great choice for console gaming, particularly if you’re looking to capture games that only run at 30 FPS anyway. For more on this card, check out Vortez’s in-depth review of the card’s capabilities for capturing gameplay.

E:\Users\Bellend\Downloads\review pics\destiny-2-pc-screenshot-001.jpg

At this point in time, it’s safe to say that 4K streaming isn’t for everyone and, until standards change and we move towards the incredibly daunting world of 8K video, it’s going to need a pretty professional setup and a fairly big budget to successfully operate. An incredibly powerful computer, very fast and reliable internet, and a quality capture card are going to be the necessities. If you can do it, however, you’ll be future-proofing your stream for years to come and producing one hell of a stream in the meantime.

How To Stream 4k60 At Its Very Best

As games are getting bigger and better and the hardware is getting more and more powerful, 4K60 is becoming the norm. If you’re a streamer, you’re going to need to learn how to capture 4K60 gameplay effectively and beautifully. Here are the tips and tricks you need to know for capturing the latest and greatest games at their very best.

It’s important to note that 4K isn’t quite ubiquitous just yet. Streaming at 4K resolutions like 3840×2160 (or even higher) is extremely demanding, and even viewing such high-quality streams can be demanding on the viewer. It takes a lot to output your games at 4K; you’re going to need fast and reliable internet and a powerful PC at the very minimum, but if you can do it then your stream will be ahead of the curve and it’s a great way to future-proof your content.

First of all, you’re more than likely going to need to use 3rd party streaming software like OBS or Xsplit. This is because capture software that comes with capture cards generally does not support 2160p, and typically won’t even allow you to stream higher than 1080p. 3rd party streaming software does, however, let you capture and stream games at higher resolutions than 1080p and so if you want to output your games in 4K you’re going to want to use OBS or Xsplit.

The settings you should be using to capture and streams games at 4K will vary on your setup and your personal requirements but here are some recommended settings to get you started. These settings should give you something to aim for and may be subject to change.

4K UHD (2160p)- same as the capture frame size

60 fps – or same as the capture frame rate

Video encoded at 16000 kb/s

Audio encoded at 128 kb/s

Encoder: Hardware

Encoder preset: quality

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Wpj9urJiUK5eeKdEVsYXe1Mlhp5BWxzcBNiomvYTsvW4DAIdALL-x16fAVLXW7OvOCSumQmyu1S7k-6USNA2GQxLLEf8KwptTnIxkB8qgPAMTb2p2JlkXhyibqRqrKm7hZ3ptKyU

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/1eaI_6L8Jap_eV_sVPZVUoVkCPpm8ZjyTyQhOew69Caq59Blhhy-nWNZzszym0rm5Jal2xPYDnLQFsc3OFaImrJm0MSR13k64qGWK55qIkNwR7QmvkgBmY_kWOmGmyR7pxsYb1hb

If you’re looking for specific settings to record gameplay, check out OBS’ recommended setup. Note that this is for recording gameplay only and not for streaming.

Internet and Bandwidth

Of course, the real hurdle for streaming out 4K video at 60 FPS is the sheer intensity of the bandwidth you’ll be outputting. Video of that quality is going to need some serious upload speeds to cope. Naturally, this means you’ll most likely need a Gigabit internet connection or some pretty powerful hardware compression.

Hardware compression is basically a means by which you can reduce the file size you’re outputting on the fly. To do that, which would be a good way to circumvent not having extremely good internet, you’d need a very capable PC. If you’re a streamer you probably already have a powerful streaming rig, but if you don’t then you’re going to need to look for a powerful GPU (a 1080 at the minimum) and a very good CPU (a high-end i7 or equivalent will most likely do).

There are some capture cards that will do hardware compression for you like the HD60 Pro. This can be useful for taking some of the burden off your computer but the HD60 Pro can’t output nearly as much bitrate as the 4K60 Pro (which can put out up to 140 Mbps instead of the HD60 Pro’s 60 Mbps). It’s a solid option if your computer isn’t a Titan-wielding beast.

Compare the capabilities of several of Elgato’s capture cards below. Their upcoming 4K60 Pro card is obviously the most capable but also naturally the most expensive.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/rOE6OlV_xhC1dkM9rRD2LRoKzhk7fnfRfiYsB-dZUBKiDTQsA5r8XFHC7QbErQgsyZolkwCoD8-L7gr_xbamRZwWOdvGe6T7G0aAAu8M8DMqts4xyDdjAcOi29I-ZxsNPff_CKOY

Capture Cards

A good capture card is essential to running a high-quality stream. You could have the fastest internet and the most powerful computer but if you don’t have the right capture card then you’re going to be struggling.

There’s a lot options available to you, and even more as we move toward 4K video being the standard. Choosing the right card may seem difficult, but if you know what your demands and capabilities are then it shouldn’t be a problem.

Elgato’s 4K60 Pro is out later this month and is a great choice for streaming at high resolutions. As broken down by TechReport, the card can competently produce 4K content if you want it to but it’s going to need a real beefy PC. At least a “sixth-generation Intel Core i7 CPU or an AMD Ryzen 7 processor, and either a Nvidia GeForce 10-series or an AMD Radeon RX Vega graphics card” as they put it. Pretty hefty. They also claim that the card will chew through an impressive 1 GB of disk space per minute at the highest bitrate. At $400 though it’s the most affordable 4K-capable capture card you’re going to find on the market.

Alternatively, Epiphan’s AV.io 4K card is a great choice for 4K streaming. With its variety of resolution options and great audio capture it’s an excellent choice. It isn’t quite as capable at producing 4K content at 60 FPS but it’ll do 4K30 just fine. The consensus on this card is essentially that it’ll do 1080p60 no problem but higher resolutions can’t do higher than 30. A great choice for console gaming, particularly if you’re looking to capture games that only run at 30 FPS anyway. For more on this card, check out Vortez’s in-depth review of the card’s capabilities for capturing gameplay.

E:\Users\Bellend\Downloads\review pics\destiny-2-pc-screenshot-001.jpg

At this point in time, it’s safe to say that 4K streaming isn’t for everyone and, until standards change and we move towards the incredibly daunting world of 8K video, it’s going to need a pretty professional setup and a fairly big budget to successfully operate. An incredibly powerful computer, very fast and reliable internet, and a quality capture card are going to be the necessities. If you can do it, however, you’ll be future-proofing your stream for years to come and producing one hell of a stream in the meantime.

Tom Parillo

Tom Parillo

I am interested in all things technology, especially automation, robotics and tech that helps change how society will live in the future.
2017-11-30T15:20:21+00:00 November 30th, 2017|Categories: Gaming, Technology|Tags: , , , |