Enermax Equilence Case Review

How to build a PC inside of the Enermax Equilence case and testing

Contents

In this section, we go over building a full PC inside of the Enermax Equilence case.  I will list the parts going into the build.

In this video, I showed you how to build a computer from the ground up, using the components mentioned above.  I did have to go slightly outside of the norm because the EVGA Z270 FTW K motherboard as right-angled USB 3.0 ports and also has a right angled 6Pin PCIe connection, though I did not need to use it so I did not cut out for it.  Most motherboards do not have right angled ports/connections, so you should be fine.

Now that the system has been built, we need to cable it, so it this video I show you the basics on that.

In that video, we went over the basics till the final product on how to cable a system.  If you do it just to connect cables, not minding air flow or aesthetics it can be done in under 10 minutes, but you want your system to look beautiful and all of the air to flow properly, so it can take a few hours from start to finish.

Aside from what I mentioned above, here are the tools and accessories I used inside of this build.

The zip ties of course I used to tidy up the cabling.  The Dremel I used to cut the hole out for the 90% angle and the car door guard was to protect against those sharp edges after the cut.  The manual Rivet gun and 3/16-inch rivets were used to keep everything nice and tight after removing the prior rivets and the black paint pen was used to paint those silver rivets black.   The ratcheting screw driver and long screw driver bit of course were to build the unit and the Magnetizer/Demagnetizer was used to magnetize the screw driver bit so that the screws would not fall off.

With some thermal testing done, with only the fans the case has included, as well as the Arctic Freezer eSports One, the fans on the EVGA Geforce GTX1080TI FTW3 and the power supply fan, the results are actually pretty surprising.  I wanted to mention, all of the temperature readings we gather using CPUID’s HWMonitor.

While this system was rendering video using Wondershare Filmora, with a bunch of Google Chrome tabs open, one of which was uploading video, Paint.NET and Microsoft Word open, here are the CPU temperatures.

We can see that the highest CPU temperature in Core #2 was 61°C, though the highest average temperature was on Core #2 at 57°C.  The Arctic Freezer eSports One is setup to rev up when it hits higher temperatures then revs back down once the CPU is within the safe zone, though 61°C is no where near the danger or throttling temperature, so it looks pretty good there.  The Intel Core i7 7700K processor begins to throttle at 100°C.

The WD Black 512GB M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe SSD WDS512G1X0C is directly under the EVGA GTX1080 FTW3 Gaming 11GB iCX Video card, so let’s see what those temperatures were at.

While running Wondershare Filmora rendering a video, with a bunch of Google Chrome tabs open, one of which was uploading video, Paint.NET and Microsoft Word open I decided to also run and finish a pass of Crystal Disk Mark to completion.  We can see that the hottest the M.2 SSD got to was 78°C and right after Crystal Disk Mark finished it quickly dropped, while writing these benchmarks, it dropped down to 53°C.  M.2’s are rated to run up to 110°C before the longevity of the drive degrades and the drive begins to throttle, though of course you would never want it to get that hot, it won’t here either.

The WD Black 512GB M.2 2280 PCIe NVMe SSD WDS512G1X0C is directly under the EVGA GTX1080 FTW3 Gaming 11GB iCX Video card, though the card itself is very cool.  This card is very silent, as like with the Arctic fans, the fans only start spinning when the heat starts building up.  I showed you the temperature the WD Black got up to during testing, and while the score of CrystalDiskMark, because of the host of tasks it was performing is irrelevant, I wanted to post it here just for your information.

Yeah, they are pretty impressive scores, even though the drive was already under load from the other tasks running.  What about the CPU?

While running Wondershare Filmora rendering a video, with a bunch of Google Chrome tabs open, one of which was uploading video, Paint.NET and Microsoft Word open I decided to also run and finish a pass of CINEBENCH to completion.

Without having the CPU overclocked, we can see that the hottest the Intel Core i7 7700K got to was 65°C.  I stopped it as CINEBENCH completed its benchmark so that you can see all cores were running at 100%.  Each time the cores hit 65°C, the Arctic Freezer eSports One would rev up a little and I would see the value drop quickly, I could not hear the rev, but I assumed that is what it did.  In case you are curious, here are the results from CINEBENCH, though again irrelevant because of the load which is not normal for a benchmark, but might be regular for a normal work load.

On average, without the load, the CPU would have scored without an overclock 975cb and overclocked at 1,052cb.  I am sure I can go higher and get the cb to blow these out of the water, but maybe I will do that on the review for the Arctic Freezer eSports One, not sure yet.

While we are at it, let’s check out what temps the GPU hits running a pass of 3DMark’s Time Spy inside of the Enermax Equilence case.

We can see here, the GPU hit 73°C with no modifications made to the fan speeds and no utilities running to regulate those temperatures like EVGA PrecisionX or MSI Afterburner.  Like the Arctic Freezer eSports One, the fan speeds regulate when they hit certain temperatures and using Precision X would help that regulation but again, it was not used.

This time there was no video rendering with Filmora, though all other applications I had mentioned previous in prior test were running.  I had just finished rendering the videos as I started up 3DMark to run Time Spy.  As I mentioned before, I will list the results of the benchmark, but they are not totally relevant to benchmarking circumstances because of the load, but maybe more towards real world use.

Maybe not the best score you have seen since this is running other workloads, but I thought it good to show you.

I think with the listing above, we have a good idea of what this case is capable of and I have mentioned time and time again how quiet it is but quiet can be relative.  Let me show you just how quiet it is.  Check out this video.

The case is pretty quiet right, even with all the components within it, in stable state in windows.  I will state, even when the computer is on, rendering videos, playing games and the likes, it is almost as quiet, maybe a tiny but louder, but very difficult to be able to notice the difference, it’s that quiet.

Now that we have gone over every aspect of the case, I think its time for my Final Thoughts and Conclusion.

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