EVGA PrecisionX Overclocking and Card Utility

EVGA’s Precision has been around for some time and has gone over many different makeovers and tons of extra features have been added.

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As I have shown you, this is what PrecisionX looks like.  So let’s dive into it, let’s start from the top left hand corner.

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First off, HW Monitor, a sweet little utility built into PrecesionX that provides GPU and system temperatures, fan speeds, clock speeds, etc… lots of info

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Next up is the OSD Setting.  OSD stand for On Screen Display, a set of text that appears on the screen when you are gaming, video/photo editing and other types of video duties.  Here are the settings when you click “OSD Settings”

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And for example, while using Paint.NET to edit images for this review, we can see the OSD.  Provides good statistics on the card itself.

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Next is “OSD”, again for On Screen Display, this will simply toggle on or off the OSD.

Start Up, like OSD toggles whether to start up PrecisionX within Windows or not to start it up.  This is just a shortcut to this setting; it is in the settings of the program as well.

ShadowPlay is a cool NVIDIA utility; this is a shortcut to it.  I will not go over it, but it can help you check for drivers, record game play videos, optimize games for optimal performance and so much more

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Then we have the big K,

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This automatically overclocks your card to full boost speed at all times.

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My overclock is only slightly better than KBoost, but it’s an effortless overclock at all times.

Default, not a lot of explanation is needed for this one I think, if you overclock too much and want to revert back to stock, just click this.

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Coming to the very bottom, we find the version of PrecisionX, 6.0.6 the Profiles.  Here we have 10 profiles that we can save custom settings into

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If you hover your mouse over any of the profiles, it will pop up this information window, but only long enough for you to read the first sentence then disappears almost mockingly. I took a screenshot to make it easier for you to read.

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Pretty easy right?

Clicking on the cog at the end of the profile pops up the “Fan Curve” window and the settings tab.

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As I showed you before, you can adjust the current fan speed by adjusting the Fan Curve, this comes from the Fan tab, on the General Tab, we have general settings, and the Start with OS I mentioned previously.

In case you were wondering how loud those fans are, check this out

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Pixel Clock allows you to overclock your monitor, careful with this; you could kill your monitor.

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A very cool feature that was introduced with these cards are the LED’s.  Clicking on the “EVGA LOGO LED” drop down shows you these options.

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But better than describe the options, I will show them to you.

Here you can see the card a bit inside of my system with the LED lighting on, aside from the video of course.

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And yes, even the bottom of the card lights up

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This is what I was mentioning early on in the review about the gimmicky lights, the adjustable RGB LED.  gimmicky as it is, I do like it.  OK, back to PrecisionX.

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Here we can save all of the profiles with hotkey assignments and all.

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Interface, allows us to change the interface of PrecisionX itself

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Framerate Target lets us set the framerate we would like the program in focus to have.  You might use this for older games that would just blow up and end the minute you start them because you have so much horse power behind the wheel now that you just didn’t have back in 1999.

Depending on what you set this do, you card could work extremely hard, or breeze through games.  This can of course cause your card to run hotter, cooler and take up more or less power.

Ok, that’s it with the Settings, let’s keep circling around PrecisionX

Curve brings back the Fan Curve and all of its settings

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Closing that again, we can also Disable or Enable the Automatic Fan control

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Then there is a little slider here where we can adjust the fan speed, default is right on the middle

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Raising that bar to 100%, then clicking apply throws the fan into overdrive and it gets real loud, but of course that is to be expect when raise the fans to 100%, 2709RPM, I saw it hit 2720RPM though.

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When you are done making any changes, make sure to click Apply.

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The middle is where you would make your changes if you are overclocking.  The power target controls the power provided to the GPU, the temp target controls the temperature at which the fans try to keep the GPU.  The GPU Clock offset overclocks the GPU, you can go up in 1Mhz increase, though with the slider it is a bit hard.  Mem Clock Offset overclocks the video cards GDDR5 memory as well in 1Mhz increments using the slider.

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EVGA thought ahead and actually lets you also overclock by clicking where the number of Mhz is and typical a number, the same applies to all of the targets and offsets.

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Using the chain I have highlighted on the left, we can link the sliders between Power Target and Temp Target, so as we slide Power Target, the Temp Target would go up as well.

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By clicking on the chain, you can link or unlink the 2.  Adjusting these target will allow you to stabilize overclocks by providing more power or lower or higher temps to the GPU.  The Temp target allows you to have a level of protection to your overclock by settings the temperature at which the GPU will throttle itself down, or downclock itself to protect itself against thermal damage.

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Adjusting the priority allows you to tell the card which is more important to focus on, Power or Temp Target.

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The voltage meter, allows you to adjust how much voltage the card receives during an overclock, be very careful with this, too much voltage will ruin your card.  Like the Power and Temp Targets, adjusting the voltage will help stabilize overclocks.  During my overclocks, I never touched this bar.

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At the top, the blue bar tells you where your GPU’s Mhz are at the moment, the base clock.  If you look at the bar itself, a little after the blue, you will see a red triangle.  The read triangle tells you where the boost clock will reach with it is required.

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Toward the bottom between the “GEFORCE GTX 1070 FTW” branding, you will see a left and a right yellow arrow.

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Pressing Right will change you to the Voltage points.  By clicking the arrow on the Basic button, you will get Manual, Linear and Basic settings.

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Selecting manual and clicking in the box to create a little green box will create a voltage/frequency offset limit.  Click Run to test them.  Let’s click the yellow right arrow again.

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This brings the HW monitoring,… in a tiny box…  Not sure why you would want to see it so small, but you can if you want to.  These are the only 3 options you get clicking the arrow.

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Top right hand corner, we can see the GPU’s in the system, I only have one.  If I had to, we can select a particular GPU to apply an overclock and change any other settings too.  If the chain is linked, it will synchronize all of the cards included in the system.

With all of these GPU and Temperature talks, we have seen a little on how hot this GPU can get, but only in numbers, let’s check actual thermal reading using the Seek Compact Thermal Sensor, a review of this sensor will come later as well.

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The first picture, shows you the temp of the GPU while running 3DMark looping for about 10 minutes, you can see here the hottest points in the card are in white, they are 56°C,  You can tell from the legend on the left.  The coolest portion in this pic is not actually on the GPU, it’s the liquid cooling on the Freezer 240MM.  On the card itself, it’s about the 30’s or so in green.

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This is the picture of the bottom of the card during the benchmarks, here the side of the fan closet to the motherboard is the coolest at are 13°C.

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After letting the card cool down for about 10 minutes, we can see the hottest point on the card was 47°C.  The hottest part is the EVGA logo, which exposes the PCB and the vents of the card.

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Since the card is under 60°C, we can see under the card, the fans are still, and the coolest portion is that same spot on the card at around 21°C.

We can see here that the card does not get very hot so the fans don’t need to do too much work.  This was also evident in the benchmarking in the earlier chapters in the review itself.  This is a good thing because the way the vents are made is that the air is vented into the case, there vents on the back of the card as seen here

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The problem is that not much air comes out of there, not only because of the vents on the side but because at the beginning of the card, where it meets the outside of the case, there is an opening.

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In that opening, you can see the rear of the card, so there is no buildup of pressure to exhaust the air.

OK, so let’s put everything together and bring this review to a close.  The next chapter “Final Thoughts and Conclusions” brings it all together.

Iggy Castillo

Iggy Castillo

Senior Editor an Reviewer at Dragonblogger.com
I have spent many years in the PC boutique name space as Product Development Engineer for Alienware and later Dell through Alienware's acquisition and finally Velocity Micro. During these years I spent my time developing new configurations, products and technologies with companies such as AMD, Asus, Intel, Microsoft, NVIDIA and more. The Arts, Gaming, New & Old technologies drive my interests and passion. Now as my day job, I am an IT Manager but doing reviews on my time and my dime.
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