The more advanced we get with technology, especially when it comes in the form of Artificial Intelligence, is going to start making companies want to learn more towards using advanced A.I. in robots to replace humans in the job market. Recently, several malls and casinos in the past have started to roll out technology that replaces humans when it comes to doing jobs. For instance, back in June of 2018, several hotel workers in Las Vegas went on strike due to jobs being replaced by humans. One example of this is at the Tipsy Robot, a bar where patrons can come and have cocktails served by a robotic arm, simply goes to show that something like this can happen. Sure, it is in a place that is advertised as such, but many hotel employees in Vegas are beginning to worry about their jobs being replaced by that of a robot.

The K5 security robot is what patrols the parking lot of this casino.
                                 (image: Twin Arrows Casino Resort)

Security over a physical casino is not something an online casino has to worry about, like the example over in Arizona at the Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort, K5, a robot that patrols the parking lot of the casino on a 24/7 shift, is what is used to be able to scan license plates as well as be able to check police records and identify stolen vehicles. The casino states that K5 is able to distract or even scare away criminals just by its sheer presence alone.  The robot replaces that of say a police vehicle will make criminals want to think twice before attempting theft or any other crime. Now, this robot is rather large in stature, but I wonder exactly how does replacing security actually cause a human to want to think twice?

My problem with having humans being replaced with robots is that humans are able to read body language when it comes to trying to detect what someone is up to whether it be good or bad. Body language sometimes says way more than our words do. How exactly can a robot detect feelings or pick up on having a bad vibe about something? I have worked in retail for over ten years and part of my jobs was to detect people possibly committing theft. Being able to read movements and have a genuine feeling of someone doing something wrong is what I believe humans will always have over robots and A.I. What would this robot in the parking lot mentioned about do if a criminal started to steal a car or actually drove off? Sure, it might be able to contact the authorities and let them know, but will it be able to let the person staying at the hotel know that their car was stolen?

My other problem with robots replacing humans is people losing their jobs to a machine. I really don’t want to see mass layoffs just because companies don’t want to have to pay out labor. Machines and humans alike are both far from perfect, but humans will always be better, in my opinion, at handling how to interact with each other more so than any robot will. Jobs these days don’t come easy and laying off people or people working in fear of losing their job to a machine, I believe, is not good ethically. While I understand trying to save money as a company, I would bet that parts don’t come at a very cheap cost unless of course there is some sort of robot insurance. However, the future is uncertain if whether or not we will see a day where most things are fully autonomous and with things such as self-driving cars and robot bartenders we are not too far off from that happening.

Brian Daniels
I've been writing articles and reviews about the video game industry for over 7 years. I also review any and all conventions that I attend as well as reviewing other products from companies such as Otterbox, HP, Amazon and Turtle Beach. I love to write and travel to many different conventions.
Brian Daniels

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Brian Daniels